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Petr Laul – Complete Scriabin Project

Petr Laul plays the complete piano works of Scriabin

In this year 2022, we celebrate the hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the birth of Alexander Scriabin. Anniversary whose celebrations began in 2021, since Scriabin has the privilege of being born in 1871 or 1872 according to the Julian or Georgian calendars.

This end of 2021, Petr Laul has set himself the incredible challenge of recording the entire work for solo piano (works with opus numbers). This represents 65 opuses and around 200 pieces.

Pianists Corner is happy to echo this exciting pianistic adventure.

The entire Petr Laul Playlist is accessible on the Pianists Corner app (Just search for “Petr Laul”).

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Shortcuts to the text :

It is customary to present Scriabin’s works according to 3 periods:

  • The first period which goes until 1903 where the influence of Chopin, Liszt or Wagner is very sensitive.
  • The second period from 1903 to 1910, transitional period where symbolism becomes more and more present.
  • The third period from 1911 to his death (1915), where he evolved towards a modernist movement.

First period (1886-1903) :

Opus 1 is a waltz. How not to see a tribute to Chopin.

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Opus 2 consists of a study, a prelude and an impromptu

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First set of mazurkas

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From the 1st movement of the first sonata

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First set of nocturnes

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The first sonata is still strongly marked by the influence of Chopin

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First set of etudes

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After an injury to his right hand which paralyzes him, Scriabin reinforces his work with the left hand which results in the writing of the prelude and the nocturne of opus 9

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New tribute to Chopin the 24 preludes of opus 11

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The second sonata is for some of maritime inspiration.

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After his concerto for piano and orchestra opus 20, Scriabin returns to writing for solo piano

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The third sonata is nicknamed “States of the soul”

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Opus 24 is a piece for orchestra “Rêverie”

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The first performance of the symphony No.1 opus 26 took place in Moscow on March 29, 1901 under the baton of his piano teacher Vasily Safonov

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Second period (1903-1910) :

The second symphony Opus 29, was created on January 12, 1902 in Saint Petersburg, under the direction of Anatoly Lyadov.

The fourth sonata is generally considered to be the beginning of Scriabin’s middle period due to the newly mystical sonorities and tonal ambiguity of the first movement.

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First set of poems

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The third symphony, opus 43, was premiered in Paris on May 29, 1905, under the direction of Arthur Nikisch

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Opus 45 consists of an album leaf, a poem and a prelude

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Opus 49 consists of an etude, a prelude and a reverie

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Opus 50 was not used by Scriabin. Maybe because of a superstition.

The 4 pieces of opus 51 are: “Fragilité”, “Prélude”, “Poème ailé” et “Danse languide”

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Opus 52 consists of two poems and an enigma (central piece)

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Created on November 18, 1908 in Moscow, the fifth sonata breaks with the classical form and has a single movement.

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The Poem of Ecstasy (op. 54) was premiered on December 10, 1908 in New York under the direction of Modest Altschuler.

Opus 55 is not used by Scriabin, again perhaps due to superstition

Opus 56 consists of 4 pieces: Prélude, Ironies, Nuances and Etude

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Opus 57 consists of 2 pieces: Désir and Caresse dansée

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Opus 59 consists of 2 pieces: Poème and Prélude

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Third period (1911-1915) :

With the sixth sonata and the symphonic poem Prometheus (op. 60), Scriabin enters his last period, turned towards a modernist current.

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The seventh sonata is also known as the “Messe blanche”

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The ninth sonata is also known as the “Messe noire”. This title is not by the composer.

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The tenth and final sonata is often called “Les insectes”.

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Opus 74 is Scriabin’s last work.

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Many thanks and congratulations to Petr Laul for sharing all of his performances.

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Personal Piano Project

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project – Midnight Pieces Episode #6

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project

Midnight Pieces – Episode #6

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Midnight Pieces

“Midnight Pieces’ is a project presenting 53 beautiful works from 53 composers (originally meant as one piece for each week of the year, plus one) – music, that is just perfect for night-time listening.

The pieces follow a hidden pattern: within each consecutive 4 works one is famous, one is by a Russian composer, one is obscure work and one is a transcription by yours truly.
These categories mix and match sometimes, but overall there are iconic and less-known pieces by well-known composers, quite a bit of breathtaking pieces by obscure composers and several world premieres of my transcriptions of rare and famous works of different authors.
I felt a need to fight the general fascination of the general audience with piano pieces that are primarily virtuosic encores (Volodos Turkish March etc), and wanted to create a project that fulfills the desire for aesthetic pleasure, for beauty of the music itself. It doesn’t mean there is no virtuosity there – there is plenty, but not as the main point at all.”

Asiya Korepanova.

Asiya Korepanova and Pianists Corner offer you a weekly rendezvous. Each rendezvous will contain 4 pieces.

© Emil Matveev

Episode #6

The composers :

“Liebestraum by Franz Liszt is a timeless song of the joyful dreams of love. It is about passion and tenderness, and all those incredible feelings that fill out hearts when we are in love. I also think that it could be a nostalgic manifest as well, in which case it is even more beautiful.” A.K.

Franz Liszt : Liebestraüme S 541 (1850) – 3. Oh Lieb, so lang du lieben kannst (A-flat major)

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“Feuillet d’Album ( Leaf from an Album) by Alexander Scriabin is a marvel, because it tells a detailed and beautiful story within 100 seconds, almost like in a 5 minute sleep where we see years of life. I am amazed how transparent this music is, and yet how colorful. How fragile, and how it can sweep us away with the power of feelings.” A.K.

Alexander Scriabin : Morceaux Opus 45 (1905) – 1. Feuillet d’Album

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“A “minute waltz”, The Puppet’s Dance by Czech composer Bohuslav Martinu embodies all the elegance of the ballroom epoch. It is tender, fast, features many moods and nuances – and brilliance. I hope it will make you want to dance!” A.K.

Bohuslav Martinů : Loutky I, H 137 (1924) – 5. Puppets Dance (Tanec loutek)

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“This transcription is a part of a major work of mine, which is the complete Rachmaninoff Cello sonata for piano solo. I transcribed the entire Sonata for piano solo because I craved to play it by myself any time I want, without depending on having or not having a cello partner. This slow movement of the sonata, the Andante, gives me chills on stage each time I play it, and I hope it will give you chills, too. The entire sonata will soon come out on a CD, along with the published score of it!” A.K.

Sergei Rachmaninoff / Asiya Korepanova : Andante from Cello Sonata Opus 19

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Previous episodes :

Personal Piano Project

Lev Naumov teaches Scriabin’s op.42 n°5 Etude in C# minor

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Lev Naumov – called the grandfather of the Russian piano school – was a pupil and then assistant of the legendary Heinrich Neuhaus. Professor at the Moscow Conservatory, he taught a whole generation of Russian pianists for more than 40 years, including Sergei Babayan (Daniil Trifonov‘s teacher), Andrei Gavrilov, Alexei Lubimov, Vladimir Bunin.

Discover the complete filiation on the poster available in the boutique

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