Pianists corner

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project – Midnight Pieces Episode #7

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project

Midnight Pieces – Episode #7

click the thumbnails to go to the pianist page

Midnight Pieces

“Midnight Pieces’ is a project presenting 53 beautiful works from 53 composers (originally meant as one piece for each week of the year, plus one) – music, that is just perfect for night-time listening.

The pieces follow a hidden pattern: within each consecutive 4 works one is famous, one is by a Russian composer, one is obscure work and one is a transcription by yours truly.
These categories mix and match sometimes, but overall there are iconic and less-known pieces by well-known composers, quite a bit of breathtaking pieces by obscure composers and several world premieres of my transcriptions of rare and famous works of different authors.
I felt a need to fight the general fascination of the general audience with piano pieces that are primarily virtuosic encores (Volodos Turkish March etc), and wanted to create a project that fulfills the desire for aesthetic pleasure, for beauty of the music itself. It doesn’t mean there is no virtuosity there – there is plenty, but not as the main point at all.”

Asiya Korepanova.

Asiya Korepanova and Pianists Corner offer you a weekly rendezvous. Each rendezvous will contain 4 pieces.

© Emil Matveev

Episode #7

The composers :

“They say that John Field invented the piano Nocturne and I disagree. The night music existed long before that. And though the views on the performing style can be absolutely polar, and many people find it unacceptable to play Bach Romantically in any way, it is hard to rule that J.S Bach’s beautiful Sinfonia in G minor did not anticipate all the future Nocturnes in the world.” A.K.

Johann Sebastian Bach : Sinfonias (1723) – 11. Sinfonia in G minor (BWV 797)

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“The subtle colors and transparency of this rare and little Dvořák composition, Vzpominaní (Reminiscing) remind me of Chopin mazurkas, having a bit of a dance-like mood to it. And although the unfolding climax in the middle is rather passionate, it doesn’t alter the overall pastel palette of the piece.” A.K.

Antonín Dvořák : Poetic Tone Pictures Opus 85 (1889) – 6. Reverie (Vzpomínání) – Andante in B major

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“Soothing, enlightening, elevating, and iconic, Franz Schubert’s Impromptu in G flat major is a mysterious world of its own. Not many people know that this worldwide known and beloved work wasn’t published for almost 30 years after its creation, and first was published in a wrong “simplified” key of G major and modified time signature, which was believed to be the original for many years!” A.K.

Franz Schubert : Impromptus D 899 (1827) – 3. Andante (G-flat major)

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“Mily Balakirev is an author of much more beautiful pieces than we are familiar with. One of them – this rarely played Nocturne in D minor, which breaks my heart each time I hear the first notes of its closing section. It’s almost mystical, enigmatic…who would expect something like this from the composer of the brave and brilliant “Islamey”? Meanwhile, the Nocturne has that shiny side, too: it’s thundering climax grows on musical material which is very similar to Islamey’s middle part. But it’s piercing lyricism is something very special…” A.K.

Mily Balakirev : Nocturne No. 3 in D minor (1902)

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Previous episodes :

Personal Piano Project

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project – Midnight Pieces Episode #6

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project

Midnight Pieces – Episode #6

click the thumbnails to go to the pianist page

Midnight Pieces

“Midnight Pieces’ is a project presenting 53 beautiful works from 53 composers (originally meant as one piece for each week of the year, plus one) – music, that is just perfect for night-time listening.

The pieces follow a hidden pattern: within each consecutive 4 works one is famous, one is by a Russian composer, one is obscure work and one is a transcription by yours truly.
These categories mix and match sometimes, but overall there are iconic and less-known pieces by well-known composers, quite a bit of breathtaking pieces by obscure composers and several world premieres of my transcriptions of rare and famous works of different authors.
I felt a need to fight the general fascination of the general audience with piano pieces that are primarily virtuosic encores (Volodos Turkish March etc), and wanted to create a project that fulfills the desire for aesthetic pleasure, for beauty of the music itself. It doesn’t mean there is no virtuosity there – there is plenty, but not as the main point at all.”

Asiya Korepanova.

Asiya Korepanova and Pianists Corner offer you a weekly rendezvous. Each rendezvous will contain 4 pieces.

© Emil Matveev

Episode #6

The composers :

“Liebestraum by Franz Liszt is a timeless song of the joyful dreams of love. It is about passion and tenderness, and all those incredible feelings that fill out hearts when we are in love. I also think that it could be a nostalgic manifest as well, in which case it is even more beautiful.” A.K.

Franz Liszt : Liebestraüme S 541 (1850) – 3. Oh Lieb, so lang du lieben kannst (A-flat major)

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“Feuillet d’Album ( Leaf from an Album) by Alexander Scriabin is a marvel, because it tells a detailed and beautiful story within 100 seconds, almost like in a 5 minute sleep where we see years of life. I am amazed how transparent this music is, and yet how colorful. How fragile, and how it can sweep us away with the power of feelings.” A.K.

Alexander Scriabin : Morceaux Opus 45 (1905) – 1. Feuillet d’Album

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“A “minute waltz”, The Puppet’s Dance by Czech composer Bohuslav Martinu embodies all the elegance of the ballroom epoch. It is tender, fast, features many moods and nuances – and brilliance. I hope it will make you want to dance!” A.K.

Bohuslav Martinů : Loutky I, H 137 (1924) – 5. Puppets Dance (Tanec loutek)

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“This transcription is a part of a major work of mine, which is the complete Rachmaninoff Cello sonata for piano solo. I transcribed the entire Sonata for piano solo because I craved to play it by myself any time I want, without depending on having or not having a cello partner. This slow movement of the sonata, the Andante, gives me chills on stage each time I play it, and I hope it will give you chills, too. The entire sonata will soon come out on a CD, along with the published score of it!” A.K.

Sergei Rachmaninoff / Asiya Korepanova : Andante from Cello Sonata Opus 19

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Previous episodes :

Personal Piano Project

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project – Midnight Pieces Episode #5

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project

Midnight Pieces – Episode #5

click the thumbnails to go to the pianist page

Midnight Pieces

“Midnight Pieces’ is a project presenting 53 beautiful works from 53 composers (originally meant as one piece for each week of the year, plus one) – music, that is just perfect for night-time listening.

The pieces follow a hidden pattern: within each consecutive 4 works one is famous, one is by a Russian composer, one is obscure work and one is a transcription by yours truly.
These categories mix and match sometimes, but overall there are iconic and less-known pieces by well-known composers, quite a bit of breathtaking pieces by obscure composers and several world premieres of my transcriptions of rare and famous works of different authors.
I felt a need to fight the general fascination of the general audience with piano pieces that are primarily virtuosic encores (Volodos Turkish March etc), and wanted to create a project that fulfills the desire for aesthetic pleasure, for beauty of the music itself. It doesn’t mean there is no virtuosity there – there is plenty, but not as the main point at all.”

Asiya Korepanova.

Asiya Korepanova and Pianists Corner offer you a weekly rendezvous. Each rendezvous will contain 4 pieces.

© Emil Matveev

Episode #5

The composers :

“Padre Antonio Soler, the “Spanish Scarlatti”, is somewhat rebellious by nature, even though we do not hear it right away. In his Sonata in C minor, he uses the old form of a sonata, where each half repeats. Scarlatti mostly wrote his sonatas in the same form; as well as many Bach’s works, including those which are not sonatas, still were written structurally the same. I love how this small piece displays so many characters – and they also can be altered in repeats! There are places for lyrical and heroic moments, mournful and cheerful episodes, embellishments and virtuosity, and yet it all starts and ends on a quiet note.” A.K.

Antonio Soler : Sonata R. 18 in C minor

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“I always loved the dreamy and exquisitely gentle Slumber Song by Robert Schumann – from his rarely played collection of Album Leaves, Op.124. The entire collection itself is so whimsical, but the opening four notes of this piece’s melody are surprisingly the same as one of the main motives of the second movement of Mahler’s Eighth Symphony, which also appears quietly and as if through a dream. I like to imagine these two works are somehow related!” A.K.

Robert Schumann : Albumblätter Opus 124 (1854) – 16. Schlummerlied

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“I have admired this piercing Intermezzo by Johannes Brahms since early childhood – each note felt like a drop of water in the silence of time, and yet all of the notes were a part of an enormous flow…Enormous in its quietness and sense of a long story captured within a short narrative. One of the very last four pieces for piano that Brahms ever wrote, this Intermezzo makes me think of it as a metaphor of his life. I first performed the entire Op.119 when I was 12 years old, and the inner connection with it never leaves me.” A.K.

Johannes Brahms : Klavierstücke Opus 119 (1893) – 1. Intermezzo in B minor – Adagio

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“Rose Adagio from the ballet Sleeping beauty is one of the most uplifting, powerfully beautiful, enlightening, regal and inspiring moments in the ballet literature…how annoyed I was one day to find that it wasn’t included in the famous Sleeping Beauty suite transcription for piano by Mikhail Pletnev! And how happy I am that this circumstance allowed me to have my own version, which I always miraculously find energy to play at the end of my solo and orchestral performances – just because it is such gorgeous music, and also because it is one of my favorite keys. This recording was made in the week that will forever be marked for me as a very sad and difficult moment of passing of my beloved grandfather, Anatoly Korepanov. He was a genius doctor and scientist, who saved thousands of lives, and who has made an insane progress throughout his own life, from a hungry boy of an obscure little village to someone whose knowledge and mastery became legendary. My transcription of Rose Adagio is dedicated to him and the memory of him, full of his bursting energy, joy of life and ability to achieve something that previously seemed impossible.” A.K.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky / Asiya Korepanova : Rose Adagio from Sleeping Beauty Ballet

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Previous episodes :

Personal Piano Project

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project – Midnight Pieces Episode #4

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project

Midnight Pieces – Episode #4

click the thumbnails to go to the pianist page

Midnight Pieces

“Midnight Pieces’ is a project presenting 53 beautiful works from 53 composers (originally meant as one piece for each week of the year, plus one) – music, that is just perfect for night-time listening.

The pieces follow a hidden pattern: within each consecutive 4 works one is famous, one is by a Russian composer, one is obscure work and one is a transcription by yours truly.
These categories mix and match sometimes, but overall there are iconic and less-known pieces by well-known composers, quite a bit of breathtaking pieces by obscure composers and several world premieres of my transcriptions of rare and famous works of different authors.
I felt a need to fight the general fascination of the general audience with piano pieces that are primarily virtuosic encores (Volodos Turkish March etc), and wanted to create a project that fulfills the desire for aesthetic pleasure, for beauty of the music itself. It doesn’t mean there is no virtuosity there – there is plenty, but not as the main point at all.”

Asiya Korepanova.

Asiya Korepanova and Pianists Corner offer you a weekly rendezvous. Each rendezvous will contain 4 pieces.

© Emil Matveev

Episode #4

The composers :

“Based on a Moravian folk melody, Leoš Janaček’s unusual and irresistibly sincere piece “Good Night!” almost makes us see a Milky Way passing by our eyes. The motif is so simple but provides a profound sense of depth, where twinkling light surpasses darkness. It somehow reminds me of Schumann’s Child Falling Asleep, there is definitely a shared sentiment between these two pieces!” A.K.

Leoš Janáček : On the Overgrown Path (1911) – Book I – 7. Good Night!

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“Originally composed for cello and piano, the Elegie by Gabriel Fauré means the world to me. Not only is this one of those rare examples when sorrow becomes ecstatic, it is also the very first piano transcription I have ever written. Having a sentimental attachment to this music, I always wanted to be able to play it by myself; and I am so happy I can do it anytime now!” A.K.

Gabriel Fauré / Asiya Korepanova : Elégie (Gabriel Fauré Opus 24)

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“Painted with transparent yet rich sounding colors, this Nocturne by Russian composer Anton Arensky is a part of his collection of 24 piano pieces, Op.36. It is Chopinesque, elegant, and still maintains the Russian character and flow. I just could not take my hands away from it, as well as from the rest of the works in this collection!” A.K.

Anton Arensky : 24 Morceaux caractéristiques Opus 36 (1894) – 3. Nocturne

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“Written by Chopin when he was just 11 years old, this little Polonaise displays an astonishing palette of colors and offers sentiments that are far beyond the composer’s age. In Russia, this polonaise is very often played by children before they “graduate’ to perform the big Chopin Polonaises – it teaches young players to hold the structure of the piece together, to be able to find subtle differences in repeats and to be as poetic as possible.” A.K.

Frédéric Chopin : Polonaise B. 5 in A-flat major (1821)

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Previous episodes :

Personal Piano Project

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project – Midnight Pieces Episode #3

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project

Midnight Pieces – Episode #3

click the thumbnails to go to the pianist page

Midnight Pieces

“Midnight Pieces’ is a project presenting 53 beautiful works from 53 composers (originally meant as one piece for each week of the year, plus one) – music, that is just perfect for night-time listening.

The pieces follow a hidden pattern: within each consecutive 4 works one is famous, one is by a Russian composer, one is obscure work and one is a transcription by yours truly.
These categories mix and match sometimes, but overall there are iconic and less-known pieces by well-known composers, quite a bit of breathtaking pieces by obscure composers and several world premieres of my transcriptions of rare and famous works of different authors.
I felt a need to fight the general fascination of the general audience with piano pieces that are primarily virtuosic encores (Volodos Turkish March etc), and wanted to create a project that fulfills the desire for aesthetic pleasure, for beauty of the music itself. It doesn’t mean there is no virtuosity there – there is plenty, but not as the main point at all.”

Asiya Korepanova.

Asiya Korepanova and Pianists Corner offer you a weekly rendezvous. Each rendezvous will contain 4 pieces.

© Emil Matveev

Episode #3

The composers :

“What did an ode to love sound like in 1907 ? Was it openly passionate and how did that passion show itself ? Alban Berg answers this question in his Liebesode, one of the Sieben Frühe Lieder (Seven Early Songs) song cycle, an early and exquisitely sensual work. Together with a poem by Otto Erich Hartleben, this music embraces us with its emotional power. I am very excited to present my transcription of it!” A.K.

Alban Berg / Asiya Korepanova : Liebesode from frühe Lieder

Poem from Otto Erich Hartleben (1864-1905)

Ode to Love (English translation, Asiya Korepanova) :

In the arms of love we fell asleep blissfully.
At the open window listened to the summer wind,
And our breath was peaceful taking out
Into the bright moonlit night. –
 
And from the garden, touching timidly,
A scent of roses came to our love bed
And gave us wonderful dreams,
Intoxicating dreams, so rich with longing!

Liebesode (1907) :

Im Arm der Liebe schliefen wir selig ein,
Am offnen Fenster lauschte der Sommerwind,
Und unsrer Atemzüge Frieden
Trug er hinaus in die helle Mondnacht.
 
Und aus dem Garten tastete zagend sich
Ein Rosenduft an unserer Liebe Bett
Und gab uns wundervolle Träume,
Träume des Rausches, so reich an Sehnsucht.

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“The beloved and famous work this week is represented by Ravel’s music. As a child, I was charmed by the art of Diego Velazquez, especially his series of portraits of the beautiful Infanta Margarita, a young princess. To me, she was an ethereal and fragile symbol of a long-gone epoch, full of wonders. Years later, when I first heard Maurice Ravel’s “Pavane pour une Infante défunte,” (Pavane for a dead princess) my first thought was about that infanta from Velazquez’s canvases – pure stillness, expectations of a youthful yet timid being and inner power, almost unnoticeable behind a transparent smile… The most amazing discovery for me was that Ravel himself thought of this connection, too! His fascination with Spanish music and culture was with him his entire life.” A.K.

Maurice Ravel : Pavane pour une infante défunte M 19 (1899)

Diego Velazquez – Infanta Margarita Teresa in a Blue Dress

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“Both rare and Russian, this gem of prelude in A flat major by César Cui is a wonderful reminder of how beautiful the music can be, even coming out of the hands and mind of someone, whose “day job” was in military engineering technology circles (which are supposedly far from the art of subtle sound details!).Who would imagine a military general creating mysterious and amorous atmospheres in his prolific and genre-wise diverse musical output ? But, despite his wonderful talent, in my opinion, Cui (the author of 15 operas, some orchestral works and many for piano, chamber groups, and voice) still remains generally underplayed and under appreciated. I hope you will agree how wonderful he is, and I am hoping to play more of his music in the course of my career.” A.K.

César Cui : 25 Preludes Opus 64 (1903) – 17. Larghetto in A-flat major

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“Domenico Scarlatti is an amazing composer, whose works allow so many different ways of interpretation – harpsichord-like playing, romantic approach, improvisation of embellishments, and many more. And he has so many sonatas, that the vast majority of them end up being rarely heard works! Here I am exploring many passing vertical sonorities and chords as I am playing Scarlatti’s Sonata K.69 without any pedal, with both of my feet on the floor and connecting all the lines (what is called legato in musical terms) with just my fingers. It helps me to create an illusion of singing when I play.” A.K.

Domenico Scarlatti : Sonata K 69 in F minor

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Previous episodes :

Personal Piano Project

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project – Midnight Pieces Episode #2

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project

Midnight Pieces – Episode #2

click the thumbnails to go to the pianist page

Midnight Pieces

“Midnight Pieces’ is a project presenting 53 beautiful works from 53 composers (originally meant as one piece for each week of the year, plus one) – music, that is just perfect for night-time listening.

The pieces follow a hidden pattern: within each consecutive 4 works one is famous, one is by a Russian composer, one is obscure work and one is a transcription by yours truly.
These categories mix and match sometimes, but overall there are iconic and less-known pieces by well-known composers, quite a bit of breathtaking pieces by obscure composers and several world premieres of my transcriptions of rare and famous works of different authors.
I felt a need to fight the general fascination of the general audience with piano pieces that are primarily virtuosic encores (Volodos Turkish March etc), and wanted to create a project that fulfills the desire for aesthetic pleasure, for beauty of the music itself. It doesn’t mean there is no virtuosity there – there is plenty, but not as the main point at all.”

Asiya Korepanova.

Asiya Korepanova and Pianists Corner offer you a weekly rendezvous. Each rendezvous will contain 4 pieces.

© Emil Matveev

Episode #2

The composers :

“Twisting my own plan ever so slightly, the next 4 pieces present TWO rare works, one famous one and one that is both Russian and my own transcription!

“Reverie” by Jean Sibelius starts the second group of pieces and I am happy to share this insanely gorgeous work by a composer that we mainly know as a symphonist and an author of one of the most powerful violin concertos… The piano music by Sibelius is performed very rarely, but is nevertheless something very special – dreamy, delicate, sonorous and endlessly romantic! Most of his piano works do not share the power and energy found in his symphonies and tone poems, yet they bring out other subtle sides of his musical personality.” A.K.

Jean Sibelius : 10 Pieces for piano Opus 58 (1909) – 1. Rêverie

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“Originally “The Girl I Love”, “The Man I Love” is one of the most beautiful love songs written by Gershwin, and one of the most famous, too. Surprisingly, at the beginning of its life, the song could not find its place in any of the musicals or shows of the time, its real fame came to it decades later. Perhaps it is the yearning character that made it an awkward fit for biting satires like Lady Be Good and Strike Up the Band” A.K.

George Gershwin / Earl Wild : Virtuoso Etudes – 3. The Man I Love

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“The Russian piece and transcription categories are combined in this next work. I have been obsessed with Mussorgsky’s Songs and Dances of Death ever since I first performed them at age 13. I was blown away by their powerful stories, and a sense of inevitability conveyed in the music. Since recording this video, I have written transcriptions of all 4 Songs, but my favorite among them has always been, and remained so the Serenade, portraying Death coming as a mysterious knight to a deadly ill young woman. I was attracted by Mussorgsky’s use of rich and sometimes spicy harmonies, and by a thrilling metaphor of a deadly love hidden between its lines. Mussorgsky created a haunting sound image by setting the poetic text in a subtle, detailed way, magnifying each moment. Lyrics by Russian poet Arseny Golenishchev-Kutuzov” A.K.

Modest Mussorgsky / Asiya Korepanova : Serenade from Songs and Dances of Death

Lyrics by Arseny Golenischchev-Kutuzov (English translation by Sergy Rybin) :

Magical languor, blue night,
Trembling darkness of spring.
The sick girl takes in, with her head dropped,
The whisper of the night’s silence.
Sleep does not close her shining eyes,
Life beckons towards pleasures,
Meanwhile under the window in the midnight silence
Death sings a serenade:
“In the gloom of captivity, severe and stifling,
Your youth is fading away;
A mysterious knight, with magic powers
I’ll free you up.
Stand up, look at yourself: with beauty
Your translucent face is shining,
Your cheeks are rosy, with a wavy plait

Your figure is entwined, like with a cloud.
The blue radiance of your piercing eyes
Is brighter than skies and fire.
Your breath flutters with the midday heat …
You have seduced me.
Your hearing is captured with my serenade,
Your voice called for a knight,
The knight has come for the ultimate reward;
The hour of ecstasy has arrived.
Your body is tender, your trembling is ravishing…
Oh, I’ll suffocate you
In my strong embraces: listen to my seductive
Chatter! … be silent!…You are mine!”

Серенада (Песни и пляски смерти – May 11, 1877) :

Нега волшебная, ночь голубая,
Трепетный сумрак весны.
Внемлет, поникнув головкой, больная
Шопот ночной тишины.
Сон не смыкает блестящие очи,
Жизнь к наслажденью зовёт,
А под окошком в молчаньи полночи
Смерть серенаду поёт:
“В мраке неволи суровой и тесной
Молодость вянет твоя;
Рыцарь неведомый, силой чудесной
Освобожу я тебя.
Встань, посмотри на себя: красотою
Лик твой прозрачный блестит,
Щёки румяны, волнистой косою

Стан твой, как тучей обвит.
Пристальных глаз голубое сиянье,
Ярче небес и огня;
Зноем полуденным веет дыханье…
Ты обольстила меня.
Слух твой пленился моей серенадой,
Рыцаря шопот твой звал,
Рыцарь пришёл за последней наградой:
Час упоенья настал.
Нежен твой стан, упоителен трепет…
О, задушу я тебя
В крепких объятьях: любовный мой лепет
Слушай!… молчи!… Ты моя!”

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“This tender and sensual piece, Nocturne by Francis Poulenc, is another rarely played work. It brings out the most precious memories – life memories, special memories. Even the memories coming from before I got to know this piece. My favorite moment is at 3’15” – soul-baring passage of fluid nostalgia.” A.K.

Francis Poulenc : 8 Nocturnes (1938) – 1. Sans traîner (C major)

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Previous Episodes :

Personal Piano Project

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project – Midnight Pieces

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project

Midnight Pieces

click the thumbnails to go to the pianist page

Midnight Pieces

“Midnight Pieces’ is a project presenting 53 beautiful works from 53 composers (originally meant as one piece for each week of the year, plus one) – music, that is just perfect for night-time listening.

The pieces follow a hidden pattern: within each consecutive 4 works one is famous, one is by a Russian composer, one is obscure work and one is a transcription by yours truly.
These categories mix and match sometimes, but overall there are iconic and less-known pieces by well-known composers, quite a bit of breathtaking pieces by obscure composers and several world premieres of my transcriptions of rare and famous works of different authors.
I felt a need to fight the general fascination of the general audience with piano pieces that are primarily virtuosic encores (Volodos Turkish March etc), and wanted to create a project that fulfills the desire for aesthetic pleasure, for beauty of the music itself. It doesn’t mean there is no virtuosity there – there is plenty, but not as the main point at all.”

Asiya Korepanova.

Asiya Korepanova and Pianists Corner offer you a weekly rendezvous. Each rendezvous will contain 4 pieces.

____________________

Find here the episodes “Midnight Pieces” :

Personal Piano Project

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project – Midnight Pieces Episode #1

Asiya Korepanova in Personal Piano Project

Midnight Pieces – Episode #1

click the thumbnails to go to the pianist page

Midnight Pieces

“Midnight Pieces’ is a project presenting 53 beautiful works from 53 composers (originally meant as one piece for each week of the year, plus one) – music, that is just perfect for night-time listening.

The pieces follow a hidden pattern: within each consecutive 4 works one is famous, one is by a Russian composer, one is obscure work and one is a transcription by yours truly.
These categories mix and match sometimes, but overall there are iconic and less-known pieces by well-known composers, quite a bit of breathtaking pieces by obscure composers and several world premieres of my transcriptions of rare and famous works of different authors.
I felt a need to fight the general fascination of the general audience with piano pieces that are primarily virtuosic encores (Volodos Turkish March etc), and wanted to create a project that fulfills the desire for aesthetic pleasure, for beauty of the music itself. It doesn’t mean there is no virtuosity there – there is plenty, but not as the main point at all.”

Asiya Korepanova.

Asiya Korepanova and Pianists Corner offer you a weekly rendezvous. Each rendezvous will contain 4 pieces.

© Emil Matveev

Episode #1

The composers :

“For the opening piece, I wrote a transcription of a beautiful and rarely performed art song by American composer Amy Beach, and premiered it on the week of her 150th anniversary of birth in September, 2017. She wrote this song on a famous poem, “Extase,” by Victor Hugo where he describes his amazing spiritual experience. “Extase” comes from a cycle Beach wrote on Hugo’s poems.” A.K.

Amy Beach / Asiya Korepanova : Extase from Songs Opus 21(transcription for piano solo)

The Amy Beach cycle Opus 21 is written from Victor Hugo’s poems

Extase (English translation) :

I was alone beside the sea, upon a starry night.
And not a cloud was in the sky, and not a sail in sight.
Beyond the limits of the world far stretched my raptured eye,
And the forests and the mountains, and nature all around,
Seemed to unite in questioning, in vast and mingled sound,
The billows of the ocean, and the splendour of the sky.
 
And the golden stars of heaven, in their unnumbered crowd,
With a thousand harmonies, with voices clear and loud,
Replied, as low they bended down their radiant crowns of flame
And the blue floods that nought has power to govern or arrest,
Replied, as low they bended down, the foam upon their crest—
‘The Lord, our great Creator, His glory we proclaim!’

Extase (Les Orientales, 25 Novembre 1828) :

J’étais seul près des flots, par une nuit d’étoiles.
Pas un nuage aux cieux, sur les mers pas de voiles.
Mes yeux plongeaient plus loin que le monde réel.
Et les bois, et les monts, et toute la nature,
Semblaient interroger dans un confus murmure
Les flots des mers, les feux du ciel.
 
Et les étoiles d’or, légions infinies,
À voix haute, à voix basse, avec mille harmonies,
Disaient, en inclinant leurs couronnes de feu ;
Et les flots bleus, que rien ne gouverne et n’arrête,
Disaient, en recourbant l’écume de leur crête :
– C’est le Seigneur, le Seigneur Dieu !

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“The second piece represents the extreme rarity of the piano repertoire. Did you know Bruckner wrote piano music? This is Erinnerung (Remembrance) by Anton Bruckner. For a long time, I only knew Bruckner as an author of glorious symphonies and profound masses and motets, as well as some pieces for strings. But piano? His style never struck me as being particularly pianistic… Erinnerung is a true gem which displays Bruckner’s typical structural approach to writing slow movements of his symphonies, where the initial simple melody develops gradually, supported by ever-growing secondary lines. I love how this piece features a beautiful climax and yet ends with a big question mark, leaving us craving for more.” A.K.

Anton Bruckner : Erinnerung in A-Flat major (1868)

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“The third piece is the worldwide piano favorite, Debussy’s Clair de Lune. Everyone knows it, but not many remember its inspiration – a subtly delicious poem by Paul Verlaine:Your soul is a delicate landscape Where roam charming masks and bergamasques Playing the lute and dancing and seeming almost Sad under their whimsical disguises. While singing in a minor key Of victorious love and easy life They don’t seem to believe in their happiness And their song mingles with the moonlight, With the sad and beautiful moonlight, Which makes the birds in the trees dream And sob with ecstasy the water streams, The great slim water streams among the marbles.” A.K.

Claude Debussy : Suite bergamasque L 75 (1905) – 3. Clair de lune

Paul Verlaine – Clair de Lune (Fêtes galantes, 1869) :

Votre âme est un paysage choisi
Que vont charmant masques et bergamasques
Jouant du luth et dansant et quasi
Tristes sous leurs déguisements fantasques.

Tout en chantant sur le mode mineur
L’amour vainqueur et la vie opportune
Ils n’ont pas l’air de croire à leur bonheur
Et leur chanson se mêle au clair de lune,

Au calme clair de lune triste et beau,
Qui fait rêver les oiseaux dans les arbres
Et sangloter d’extase les jets d’eau,
Les grands jets d’eau sveltes parmi les marbres.

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“The fourth piece is Russian, and it is a Prelude by the Russian-Soviet Dmitry Kabalevsky, No.8 from his cycle of 24 preludes for piano! This cycle is considered one of Kabalevsky’s best compositions, and it definitely deserves to be played much more often than it gets to be these days. Many pianists were absolutely obsessed with this music in the mid-twentieth century, and now I am, too. Kabalevsky wrote his preludes, masterfully incorporating and developing different folk tunes, songs and dances into the texture of his music. I love how the Prelude No. 8 within just two minutes displays a character which is lyrical, slightly ironic, and passionate at the same time.” A.K.

Dmitry Kabalevsky : Preludes Opus 38 (1944) – 8. Andante non troppo, Semplice e cantando – Poco Agitato – Tempo I

Personal Piano Project

Pietro De Maria in Personal Piano Project – The Well-Tempered Clavier II as an Advent calendar

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The Well-Tempered Clavier II as an Advent calendar

Homemade Recordings

“With all the concerts that were canceled because of the pandemic, a common problem for many musicians was to find motivations for practicing. I didn’t really feel like learning the new pieces I had to prepare for concerts that would not take place. At the end of November 2020 I thought of retaking the WTC Book II, something I had already performed in public. This is one of those masterpieces I always like to play, no matter if I have to perform it in front of an audience or not. Bach’s music is something a pianist can’t do without: it’s good for the brain, for the fingers and for the soul. In a period in which we all felt a little lost, I needed some spiritual nourishment and Bach is always ideal for that. The idea was to create an Advent Calendar in music and to publish one Prelude and Fugue a day on my YouTube channel from the 1st to the 24th of December. There is not a particular reason for the order of publication I chose. Every morning I asked myself what I wanted to record on that day (sometimes more than just one Prelude and Fugue) and I did it! The pieces have been recorded on my Yamaha at home with my iPhone and a little microphone. Of course the purpose was not to do a professional recording of a piece I had already recorded for Decca!”

Pietro De Maria.

December 1

Prelude No. 16 in G minor – BWV 885 / Fugue No. 16 in G minor – BWV 885

December 2

Prelude No. 19 in A major – BWV 888 / Fugue No. 19 in A major – BWV 888

December 3

Prelude No. 24 in B minor – BWV 893 / Fugue No. 24 in B minor – BWV 893

December 4

Prelude No. 20 in A minor – BWV 889 / Fugue No. 20 in A minor – BWV 889

December 5

Prelude No. 10 in E minor – BWV 879 / Fugue No. 10 in E minor – BWV 879

December 6

Prelude No. 8 in E-flat minor – BWV 877 / Fugue No. 8 in E-flat minor – BWV 877

December 7

Prelude No. 21 in B-flat major – BWV 890 / Fugue No. 21 in B-flat major – BWV 890

December 8

Prelude No. 5 in D major – BWV 874 / Fugue No. 5 in D major – BWV 874

December 9

Prelude No. 4 in C-sharp minor – BWV 873 / Fugue No. 4 in C-sharp minor – BWV 873

December 10

Prelude No. 17 in A-flat major – BWV 886 / Fugue No. 17 in A-flat major – BWV 886

December 11

Prelude No. 14 in F-sharp minor – BWV 883 / Fugue No. 14 in F-sharp minor – BWV 883

December 12

Prelude No. 12 in F minor – BWV 881 / Fugue No. 12 in F minor – BWV 881

December 13

Prelude No. 18 in G-sharp minor – BWV 887 / Fugue No. 18 in G-sharp minor – BWV 887

December 14

Prelude No. 15 in G major – BWV 884 / Fugue No. 15 in G major – BWV 884

December 15

Prelude No. 6 in D minor – BWV 875 / Fugue No. 6 in D minor – BWV 875

December 16

Prelude No. 11 in F major – BWV 880 / Fugue No. 11 in F major – BWV 880

December 17

Prelude No. 3 in C-sharp major – BWV 872 / Fugue No. 3 in C-sharp major – BWV 872

December 18

Prelude No. 23 in B major – BWV 892 / Fugue No. 23 in B major – BWV 892

December 19

Prelude No. 9 in E major – BWV 878 / Fugue No. 9 in E major – BWV 878

December 20

Prelude No. 7 in E-flat major – BWV 876 / Fugue No. 7 in E-flat major – BWV 876

December 21

Prelude No. 22 in B-flat minor – BWV 891 / Fugue No. 22 in B-flat minor – BWV 891

December 22

Prelude No. 2 in C minor – BWV 871 / Fugue No. 2 in C minor – BWV 871

December 23

Prelude No. 13 in F-sharp major – BWV 882 / Fugue No. 13 in F-sharp major – BWV 882

December 24

Prelude No. 1 in C major – BWV 870 / Fugue No. 1 in C major – BWV 870

Thank you Maestro!

Personal Piano Project

Marta Czech in Personal Piano Project – The complete Beethoven Sonatas

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The complete Beethoven Sonatas

Recordings made in Bielsko-Biała (Poland)

in 7 sessions between 11/08/2020 and 14/11/2020

“About 2 years ago I started working on the 32 piano sonatas by Ludwig van Beethoven, as well as his 5 Piano concertos. The goal was to perform the complete cycle in public, unfortunately this was made impossible by he pandemic. Regardless of this, I am immensely grateful that I had the possibility to record it on a wonderful Fazioli piano. This certainly the most enriching artistic project of my life and I hope to be able to perform the cycle in public as soon as the pandemic is over.”

Marta Czech.

The entire playlist of Marta Czech is also available on the app Pianists Corner (click the picture below).

Also don’t miss her new video of the ninth symphony transcribed by Liszt :

Sonata WoO 47 n°1 in E-flat major (1783)

Sonata WoO 47 n°2 in F minor (1783)

Sonata WoO 47 n°3 in D major (1783)

Sonata No. 1 Opus 2 n°1 in F minor (1795)

Sonata No. 2 Opus 2 n°2 in A major (1795)

Sonata No. 3 Opus 2 n°3 in C major (1795)

Sonata No. 4 Opus 7 in E-flat major (1797)

Sonata No. 5 Opus 10 n°1 in C minor (1797)

Sonata No. 6 Opus 10 n°2 in F major (1798)

Sonata No. 7 Opus 10 n°3 in D major (1798)

Sonata No. 8 – Pathétique – Opus 13 in C minor (1798)

Sonata No. 9 Opus 14 n°1 in E major (1798)

Sonata No. 10 Opus 14 n°2 in G major (1799)

Sonata No. 11 Opus 22 in B-flat major (1800)

Sonata No. 12 Opus 26 in A-flat major (1801)

Sonata No. 13 Opus 27 n°1 in E-flat major (1801)

Sonata No. 14 – Moonlight Sonata – Opus 27 n°2 in C-sharp minor (1802)

Sonata No. 15 – Pastorale – Opus 28 in D major (1801)

Sonata No. 16 Opus 31 n°1 in G major (1802)

Sonata No. 17 – The Tempest – Opus 31 n°2 in D minor (1802)

Sonata No. 18 Opus 31 n°3 in E-flat major (1802)

Sonata No. 19 Opus 49 n°1 in G minor (1797)

Sonata No. 20 Opus 49 n°2 in G major (1796)

Sonata No. 21 – Waldstein – Opus 53 in C major (1804)

Sonata No. 22 Opus 54 in F major (1804)

Sonata No. 23 – Appassionata – Opus 57 in F minor (1805)

Sonata No. 24 – à Thérèse – Opus 78 in F-sharp major (1809)

Sonata No. 25 Opus 79 in G major (1809)

Sonata No. 26 – Les Adieux – Opus 81a in E-flat major (1810)

Sonata No. 27 Opus 90 in E minor (1814)

Sonata No. 28 Opus 101 in A major (1816)

Sonata No. 29 – Hammerklavier – Opus 106 in B-flat major (1818)

Sonata No. 30 Opus 109 in E major (1820)

Sonata No. 31 Opus 110 in A-flat major (1821)

Sonata No. 32 Opus 111 in C minor (1822)

And a special Bonus…

Diabelli Variations Opus 120 (1823)

Personal Piano Project